JD McPherson

JD McPherson

Sam Lewis

Tuesday, July 24

Doors: 6:00 pm / Show: 8:00 pm

$25.00 - $35.00

This event is 21 and over

Ticket Policy
Many of our shows sell out well in advance. All sales are final; no refunds and no exchanges.

To Guarantee seating, please purchase Reserved Seating Ticket Levels.

General admission does not guarantee a seat.

Flash photography is prohibited. We are a 21+ club. 

All event information is subject to change. Please check back before date of event.

Sections: 

Green - Banex/Grey - Alley/Purple - Floor/Blue - Mid Level/Red - Upper Level
 

 

JD McPherson
JD McPherson
​“I was having nightmares every night, thinking, ‘Wow, they’re going to hate this,” says JD McPherson. When he talks about his new album, Undivided Heart & Soul, there’s no glimmer of self-adulation, or even the confidence one might expect of a veteran artist. Instead, there’s a snapshot of McPherson’s creative process bringing the record to life, a journey filled with fear and change, then boldness, and, eventually, catharsis. The best rock music has a story to tell. This record chronicles a series of upheavals, frustrations, roadblocks, and kismet—a cross-country move, failed creative relationships, a once-in-a-lifetime career opportunity, and learning to love making music again by letting go. McPherson calls moving his family from Broken Arrow, Oklahoma, to East Nashville a decision based “on opportunity” and one he was reluctant to make but notes the profound influence the city has had on his new crop of songs. “Up to this point, I thought I knew what I was doing with songwriting, that I don’t do this or that,” McPherson says. “Writing with people who co-write for a living...maybe I saw myself as John Henry, and them as the steel-driving machine.” Along with collaborations with fellow Oklahoman Parker Millsap, Butch Walker, and Aaron lee Tasjan, McPherson’s selections for Undivided Heart & Soul include many deeply personal themes: “Let’s Get Out of Here While We’re Young” shares writing credits with longtime bandmate Ray Jacildo and McPherson’s wife Mandy. He also delved into character profiles, both fictional and based on real-life experiences, stories McPherson has held onto but never thought of as fodder for songwriting, such as the Las Vegas bus station interlude detailed in “Style (Is a Losing Game).” “That seems like a pretty normal thing for a singer-songwriter to do, to write about personal experience, but I really have never done that,” McPherson says. “It felt great but it also was tough at the same time. The thing is, John Henry is trying to beat the machine because he’s in awe of it. It was a lot of me saying, ‘You’re really good at this, and I have a hard time doing it.’” With a group of soul-baring tracks taking shape, McPherson and crew scheduled studio time to help force the issue. It quickly became apparent that these sessions were not going to work, bringing McPherson’s momentum to a halt. To clear his head, he flew to Los Angeles at the invitation of friend and longtime supporter Josh Homme of Queens of the Stone Age, who was also recording at the time. McPherson, Homme, and his Queens bandmate Dean Fertita played around with some songs, with Homme pushing McPherson outside of his comfort zone in a no-stakes environment. “His thing was, ‘I’m going to throw all kinds of crap onto your songs that you’re not going to want to hear, and you’re going to play ridiculous stuff you wouldn’t normally do,’ and Dean was kind of the calming presence,” McPherson says. McPherson calls the getaway “the most fun I’ve had since I was 15 years old” and returned to Nashville with a clear head, internal filters successfully stifled, ready to move forward. That fresh perspective in tow, McPherson learned that the long-shot “backup” studio, the legendary RCA Studio B in Nashville, was willing to host his band for the making of the record. RCA Studio B was fundamental to the creation of the “Nashville Sound,” and the ghosts of some of the greatest songs in history live within its walls: Dolly Parton’s “I Will Always Love You,” and Elvis Presley’s “Are You Lonesome Tonight?” among them. Artists who choose to record at Studio B are met with a rigorous list of requirements, including using a recording method appropriate during the studio’s heyday. Since the studio is a working museum by day, the entirety of McPherson’s workspace had to be reset at night: Load in all equipment in the late afternoon, work until 3:00 or 4:00 a.m., and leave no trace nightly. Repeat. Repeat. Repeat. “Those rules would probably turn a lot of bands off, but they turned us on, 100 percent,” McPherson says. “I really love walking into a classic studio as much as I love getting my hands on a really old guitar. I like knowing that something was used for a long time and has good things in it.” But this isn’t an old Nashville record, by any measurement, nor is it the record McPherson set out to make, with credit due to co-producer Dan Molad (also the drummer for Lucius). “There’s a pretty broad gap in our tastes, what we do and what we’re into,” McPherson says. Where he’s as likely to lean on The Cramps as he is Irma Thomas for inspiration, Molad’s left-field production suggestions included a Casio synthesizer and running a Fender Rhodes through a tape delay. (McPherson nixed the former; the latter became the signature sound of one of the record’s tracks.) “We ended up learning a lot from each other, and he did a lot of stuff I’d have never thought to do.” During the song “Let’s Get Out of Here While We’re Young,” JD sputters the line “We’ve worn out all the songs we’ve sung.” This is not a statement McPherson takes lightly. “This record was difficult for me to make, difficult to write, difficult to record. It took a lot for me to say that I can’t force these songs to be the way people are expecting,” McPherson says. Undivided Heart & Soul is a statement record, one that asserts McPherson as he is now, battle-weary but stronger than ever.
Sam Lewis
Sam Lewis
Like many before him, Sam Lewis came to Nashville to make music. But unlike the majority, Lewis managed to hop on one of the most successful tours that country music has seen as of late. He's collaborated with everyone from John Prine and Kacey Musgraves to The Wood Brothers. Chris Stapleton dubbed him "a modern Townes Van Zandt". And while he's often labeled with some form of the word 'soulful' (some have even compared his voice to molasses), Lewis' style meets at a juncture of many different genres. There's something about Sam Lewis that is indescribably different -- and with his newest project, he's discovered what most musicians spend lifetimes working for -- the place where feel-good music meets vital social commentary.

When Lewis decided to make the move from Knoxville to Nashville in summer 2009, he was still working full-time at Walmart (a gig that lasted nearly a decade). In his off-time, he began playing smaller local venues including the 5 Spot, where he met fel- low singer-songwriter Matt Urmy. After forming a friendship, Urmy offered to help Lewis "We went to his basement, I laid down some songs, we pieced a band together and made a record in a couple days at Eastwood Studios." That record would become Lewis's first official release and self-titled debut that featured Nashville greats Kenny Vaughan, Reggie Bradley Smith, Dave Jacques, and Derek Mixon. And with Lewis' sole intention of moving to be a musician that 'records it and tours it' - he did just that - traveling from Nashville to New York via train to play shows, then spending a month in England.

By late 2014, Lewis had turned 30, established himself with the Nashville music scene, and signed with the boutique Georgia label, Brash Records. With the help of Brash and producer Oliver Wood of The Wood Brothers, Lewis released his second full- length, Waiting on You, in April 2015. The sophomore was critically acclaimed and once again featured Kenny Vaughan, in addition to Darrell Scott, Gabe Dixon, the McCrary Sisters, and Willie Nelson's legendary harmonica player, Mickey Raphael. While No De- pression compared Lewis' soulful style with the likes of Al Green and Van Morrison, Craig Havighurst (Music City Roots) coined Waiting on You as "Americana with a groovy twist". While the album racked in incredible reviews, Lewis' booking agency also got bought out in the same time frame - unfortunately leaving him with a solid album, but no tour dates to show for it.

Lewis applied to work at a Post Office in East Nashville but by the time he got a call for a second interview, someone else had called with a more enticing offer: the open- ing spot for the Traveler release show, Chris Stapleton's Grammy-winning album. From there, life moved fast. Lewis toured with Stapleton for the remainder of summer 2015, and by January 2016, found himself playing sold-out 2 and 3-night shows at venues like The Tabernacle and the Ryman Auditorium.

During that time, Lewis was driving to play a show in Richmond when he spotted a bright, rainbow building just off the interstate. "The building had a word on it, but all I could see was -SITY," he says, "I immediately said 'loversity', even though the sign said 'di- versity'. My friend and I Googled it and it wasn't a real word, but I thought, well, I like that word." A week later, Lewis returned home and immediately wrote "Loversity", which would set the tone for his album.

Lewis' forthcoming record Loversity is set to be released on May 4, 2018. The album is composed of 14 tracks that Lewis has spent over a year and a half writing and playing for others. Since Waiting on You, his classic style remains present yet matured, with a more re- fined worldview, "These newer songs have been harder to write, but extremely necessary given the current climate I find the world in." Recorded at Southern Ground Studios with engineer and co-producer Brandon Bell, the album spans from upbeat songs like the title track "Loversity" to the darker "One in the Same," an electric guitar heavy ballad with a dri- ving force reminiscent of the Black Keys' Brothers. While most songs are originals, the record includes "Accidental Harmony", a lullaby that fellow Nashville songwriter John Mann wrote for his first born child, and "Natural Disaster", a Loudon Wainwright song that Lewis felt drawn to.

And while each song varies in tone, they all circle back to one universal theme. "This is the closest thing I'll ever write to a concept album. The idea is that we are all trying to get somewhere -- all running from something and toward something. We're all together in it, though." As current events in the world divide the masses based on difference, Sam Lewis' new album is a soul-filled, catchy collection of reminders that diversity and unity can co-exist.
Venue Information:
Club Helsinki
405 Columbia St
Hudson, NY, 12534
https://helsinkihudson.com/